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comments@captioncolorado.com >> couric: tonight, emergency workers return to japan's crippled nuclear plant after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but
crowley in washington. stay tuned to cnn for much more coverage of the disaster in japan. up next, "fareed zakaria gps." >> this is "gps," the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world? i'm fareed zakaria. i'll give you my take on the tragic devastation in japan. but first, here is the latest. the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami. japan's prime minister says his country is grappling with its worst crisis since world war ii. it's a race against time for rescue workers. the official death toll now stands at more than 1,200. but it will rise. one regional official says the deaths in his area alone were undoubtedly in the tens of thousands. 200,000 people living near a nuclear power plant in fukushima have been evacuated. there was explosion in a reactor yet and there are fears that there he will will be another explosion at a different reactor at the same plant. the world is trying to help out. the u.s.s. ronald reagan arrived off the coast on sunday and made dozens of trips delivering aid. meanwhile, more video is emerging of the sheer scale
the biggest earthquake and tsunami in japan. aftershocks are a given, but the latest jolt with the preliminary magnitude of 6.4 was apparently not an aftershock at all but a new earthquake in its own right. the quake on friday and most of the tremors since have been northeast of the capital. that's where the loss, the devastation, they're simply too much to bear. the official death toll stands at 3,373 with more than twice that number officially listed as missing. the real numbers are unknown, certainly much higher. here's a more solid number for you. 91, that's the latest count of countries big and small offering some kind of help, according to japan's foreign ministry. through it all the most immediate crisis is the fukushima daichi nuclear plant. all three reactors that were online at the time of the quake have endured explosions in the building that housed them. earlier today a fire broke out in a building that houses a fourth reactor and the radiation went into the atmosphere. the fire is out now. the government says radiation levels at the plant are no longer harmful to human health. tha
jones industrial average was up 150 points on signs japan could be getting the upper hand and he cuts it down to size and the news breaks he is saying he will threaten his people and then trade is fighting out, some cutting out, and others back in, so it finishes up 160 points so they dismiss the crazy guy for now. if you needed the prove, the forces are alive and well at wall and broad. but who wins? the one trying to contain the nuclear menace or the other being a many nasa. and what do you say? >>guest: we are at a crossroads and we are in a global economy. it is amazing 24 slash -- 24/7, and everyone is happy with the nuclear contains and muammar qaddafi comes out and stocks fall apart so we don't know from minute to minute or day-to-day the next headline and it makes it difficult to ride the roller coaster. >>neil: global events dictate the market. will that be the rule for a while? >>guest: it will be the rule for a long time. the foreseeable future. the two events we are talking about, were unforeseen. we were not thinking libya would fall apart six months ago or for see we hav
the will and the determination to come back after something like this, it is japan. and we'd like to encourage you to help them. they need it. we've made it really easy for you. just go to our web page cnn.com/impact. >>> and now it's time for me to pass it over to brooke baldwin. brooke, you can't help but want to help these people when you look at these images? >> absolutely. cnn.com/impact. thank you, randi. >>> i want to begin this newscast today with an image i cannot shake. an entire village wiped out in 90 seconds. 90 seconds for the ocean to swell and overtake this one town while those who live there, those who had moved quickly enough, watched from higher ground. watch this with me. >> doesn't that just take your breath away? imagine you're one of the fortunate perched atop this hill watching your home, your town, people scrambling in the bottom left watching it all being wiped away. that was friday in miyagi prefecture. the twin forces in that tsunami were just the beginning. look at this. we have the satellite photo from digital globe and it shows the damage to the reactors at the fukushima daiichi
kneejerk reactions that didn't seem to take into account the new nuances of the crisis japan is experiencing. the fact is that the idea of more nuclear energy was just starting to gain ground in the united states, given the interest in clean, abundant and cheap energy. that nuclear renaissance in america is now in danger. right now one-fifth of america's electricity comes from 104 nuclear reactors. they're expensive. companies were loathed to build them, given the tangle of regulations so the federal government offered loan guarantees to get operators to invest their money. president obama is asking for $36 billion for nuclear power in this year's proposed budget. 12 applications right now for construction and licenses. but real safety issues during unforeseen catastrophic events like what happened in japan will have to be addressed by the industry. we still need alternatives to oil and coal, but we'll have to see whether more nuclear generated electricity is part of our future. that's it for me now. brooke baldwin takes over with "newsroom". >>> we are going to take you to l
yesterday who is writing about that. >> no doubt about it. first, obviously, the big news out of japan. we why don't we get the latest. >> we are talking about the fifth strongest earthquake on record since 1900. hawaii and other parts of the pacific are bracing for a destructive tsunami triggered by an 8.9 earthquake out of japan. it shows a massive 23-foot wall of watter that swept boats, cars, buildings and tons of debris inland. 32 people have now died in the quake. a figure that is expected to rise. a tsunami warning is now in place for the entire u.s. west coast. that means coastal communities in washington, oregon, california and southern alaska should be on alert and prepared for possible evacuation. a warning is also in place for hawaii, which was struck by a smaller 4.5 earthquake earlier today. now, there are no immediate reports of injuries or damage in hawaii but the state is bracing for the first waves from the tsunami which are expected to hit at 8:00 a.m. eastern time this morning. now, ahead of that, tsunami sirens were sounded and coastal areas are being evacuated. fires
of the globe and japan and the u.s. it would follow a little possible parcel of radiation all the way across the country and pacific. it would take many days. a lot of the radiation would be gone. there's just no threat. >> we will see. you'll keep watching, it as will i, but thanks so much for watching it here. want to turn things over to jessica yellin in "the situation room." jess, to you. >> happening now, breaking news. three nuclear reactors damaged to the core. the crisis in japan is said to be deteriorating right now. u.s. officials are suggesting the situation is more dire than many thought. with america's top nuclear watchdogs saying radiation levels are extremely high. freezing cold and snow adding to the hardship for quake and tsunami survivors there and hampering the rescue and recovery. more people now seem eager to get out of japan all together. >>> and wolf blitzer's one-on-one interview with secretary of state hillary clinton in egypt. she's talking about the disaster in japan, as well as the uprisings in libya and across the region. welcome to our viewers in the united stat
on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be exposed to are potentially lethal in a short period of time. it's nearly six days now since the earthquake and tsunami killed at least 4300 people and damaged the nuclear reactors. today, u.s. officials told americans within 50 miles of the plant to evacuate the area or stay indoors. that is two and a half times as wide as the danger zone established by the japanese. harry smith begins tonight's coverage of the disaster in japan. >> reporter: in a sign of how grave japan's crisis has become, the emperor, akihito, made an unprecedented television address, acknowledging that he is deeply worried, urging his subjects not to give up. it did little to calm a country increasingly distrustful, given the wave of conflicting reports and mixed messages. >> ( translated ): there is both positive and negative news. i don't know which i should believe. >> reporter: and toda
york. the president is expected to make a statement about japan at 3:30 eastern time as japan grapples with a nuclear crisis and the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami there. the latest, the death toll stands at 5,429. nearly 10,000 people still missing. at the pufukushima nuclear plan desperate attempts to cool the reactor but these efforts are having limited impact. and the danger of radiation has delayed efforts to permanently restore water to the pumps to cool the reactor. power may not be up and rung until tomorrow at the earliest. the spnk giving military families the okay to leave major u.s. bases across japan. that order covers more than 40,000 people there. in addition, the u.s. is sending potassium iodide into the country in case people want to use it. and as a precaution, homeland secretary janet napolitano says all passengers and cargo from japan will now be screened for radiation in an abundance of caution. let's get to the white house briefing now. press secretary jay carney joined by gregory jaczko of the nuclear regulatory commission in this country. let's listen.
>>> we've been showing you all kinds of destruction in japan. that's a little shaking, mud-spattered cocker span yell in the sendai area. he watched over his injured friend since the tsunami destroyed his home. rescue crews took both dogs to a vet for treatment. >>> candy crowley is anchors "the situation room." >>> now, breaking news. urgent new teams to cool down an overheated reactor. now the u.s. government is stepping in to evacuate possibly thousands of americans from the country and get them away from any nuclear danger. secretary of state hillary clinton tells our wolf blitzer she's worried about the health and saved of americans in japan even as she heads home from tunis tunisia. i'm candy crowley, you're in "the situation room." nuclear experts say the new attempt to douse an overheated reactor has been somewhat effective. helicopters, fire trucks and police water cannons all have been deployed. we are told that radiation levels dipped, but they are still high, so the frarchtic work to prevent a full-scale meltdown goes on. cnn's anna coren is nil tokyo. just brin
away in tokyo a meeting of japan's prime minister at parliament turned to utter chaos. >> they're showing a city now on japanese television that looks like it's almost completely on fire. >> sparked fires in homes across the country and an oil refinery, a nuclear power plant shut down but no radiation escaped. closed airports. japan's famous bullet train shut down stranding hundreds of commuters. and then, a 23-foot wall of water crashed ashore. the tsunami sweeping away everything in its path. small boats smashed to bits. cars upturned and bobbing in the water. ships smashing against each other in part and a report of a ship with 100 people swept away. here's the latest on the devastation now. police in japan say 200 to 300 bodies have been found in sendai, the city closest to the epicenter. japanese tv reports as many as 4 million buildings in tokyo and their surrounding suburbs without power. scientists now say this quake is the fifth largest in the world since 1900. and it's the largest ever recorded in japan. a little more than an hour ago the first waves hit the u.s. main
>>> choppers in the air, water cannons on the ground, japan launches an attack on a crippled nuclear reactor hoping sea water can stop an unfolding nuclear catastrophe on this "american morning." i'm christine romans. welcome to "american morning." it's march 17th, st. patrick's day. >> st. paddy's day. you are irish? >> somewhere am i irish. >> have you have green eyes. >> i'm irish. >> i'm kiran chetry. we're following the latest on japan's crisis. the focus is how to get the reactors cooled down, specifically reactor number three at fukushima's daiichi power station. military helicopters are dropping 30 tons of sea waters on the crippled reactor's pool. >> they're also spraying on the ground, up to a dozen water truxz a trucks are in place. the united states is telling americans to get at least 50 miles away from the reactor. >> there is one more critical development to watch for, engineers are planning to begin the process, which is key in this whole thing, of restoring power to the daiichi complex. they want to bring in external power lines to try to get the plant's cool
. the japanese government has to help 0 to fund the investment. japan's energy body. the brazilian mining firm has a huge share of the world niobium market. it is needed to make high grade steel plates for automobiles. ni ppo n steel has been getting its steel from the brazilian firm. a leading steel maker is planning to acquire 5% stake in the same mining firm. >>> the united states is hoping japan will join a transpacific free trade agreement. u.s. trade representative ron kirk spoke on wednesday at a trade symposium. >> japan's future will be as its past was and that is being a competitor in a robust, global environment but that meant japan was going to have to confront the challenge of opening its agricultural market. >> kirk praised japan's decision to join the tpp negotiations in an annual report issued this week. the office stated one of the goals for 2011 is substantial progress on the tpp. it is a u.s.-backed multilateral free trade agreement for the region. >>> negotiations are underway between the united states, australia and seven other countries. japan will decide whether to parti
good thing; he just made it. of japan. >>> welcome to nhk world "newsline." as worries grow over unrest in the middle east, crude oil futures have hit again $100 a barrel in new york. buy orders increased on tuesday as market players became more concerned about future oil supplies on news that iran security forces clamped down on anti-government protesters. iran is the second largest oil producer among opec oil member countries. this e benchmark wti crude futures topped $100 a barrel in after-hours trading for the first time since last wednesday. the index is now at that price. on the new york stock exchange, share prices plunged on tuesday amid growing worries that higher oil prices may slow down the world economic recovery. the dow jones industrial average closed at 12058, down 168 points from the previous day. u.s. federal reserve chairman ben bernanke has indicated america's economy is growing at a faster pace than last year but he cautions over soaring oil prices over continuing soaring prices in the arab world. >> sustained rises in the price 0 of oil and other commodities
-government rally. welcome to "bbc world news." coming up later, japan's nuclear safety agency raises the accident alert levels at the fukushima nuclear plant saying the situation is serious. a nation remembers. japan holds a minute of silence for those who died in the earthquake and tsunami a week ago. ♪ the u.s. president barack obama has said the libyan leader colonel gaddafi must obey the u.n. demands or face military action. earlier, the libyan government announced an immediate ceasefire and promised to follow the u.n. resolution passed on thursday. he said colonel gaddafi had to stop all attacks on civilians, pull back his troops, and allow in humanitarian aid. >> now once more, muammar gaddafi has a choice. the resolution that passed lays out very clear conditions that must be met. the united states, the united kingdom, france, and arab states agree that a cease-fire must be implemented immediately. that means all attacks against civilians must stop. gaddafi must stop his troops from advancing on benghazi. he must pull them back from misurata and established water, gas, and electricity su
in libya, across the middle east and japan. wolf in washington. two. happening right now, breaking news. president barack obama warns libyan troops and moammar gadhafi to stop attacks against civilians or face military action. how far will the u.s. and its allies go to enforce a u.n.-authorized no-fly zone? also this hour, a new level of crisis at japan's crippled snuk power plant. as the race goes on to heat down those reactors, officials now say this disaster is on par with the worst nuclear accident in u.s. history and mile after mile of destruction, search and rescue crews barely know where to begin. we're with emergency teams risking their own lives to save others. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama says the world has given moammar gadhafi ample warning that his bloody assault on rebel forces will not stand. mr. obama putting gadhafi on notice just a while ago, a day after the u.n. security council approved the use of force to protect civilians in libya. the president says the libyan leader would commit atrocities if left unchecked and thousands o
as it is emotional. >> fox news alert for you now. japan is racing to avoid a potential nuclear meltdown and the death toll from the earthquake and the tsunami may soar more than 10,000. >> clayton: and we're covering the details, peter doocy in washington, and we will he' start with david piper live from tokoyo with the latest on the ground. david, what can you tell us at this hour. >> yes, good morning, the japanese government is warning there could be another explosion, at that stricken nuclear plant about 160 miles north of here. apparently, they're pumping sea water around the reactor to try to cool it down. and stop any kind of meltdown. and this is the same complex in which it was feared another reactor was going to melt down yesterday after there was an explosion there, also, the japanese authorities say ne could be a partial meltdown already, but they don't know because they can't get into the reactor. the real threat of a massive radiation release from this plant has forced over 170,000 people to be evacuated for a 12 mile radius around the plan the and the japanese government
>>> japan's nuclear nightmare growing even more desperate this morning as a cloud of smoke forms above the crippled daiichi power station, a sign that the containment vessel may have been breached. we're following the latest minute-by-minute developments on this "american morning." >>> welcome, again, thanks for being with us. >> a lot to cover this morning. in japan, the number of dead and the level of fear are rising fast. here are the latest developments in what is likely to be the costliest natural disaster the world has ever witnessed. more than 3,700 have been killed. close to 8,000 people are missing following friday's 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami. >> japanese officials fear it may have been caused by a breach in the containment vessel of reactor number three. officials are now bringing in helicopters to drop water into a cooling pond through the damaged roof of the reactor hoping to slow or stop any meltdowns. >>> for several hours last night, things grew so tense at the power plant, work was suspended and everyone there was told to evacuate. now, they've now retu
're having a hearing this morning on the nuclear reactor disaster in japan. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] >> ok, why don't we get started? thank you all for being here. this is a briefing, not a hearing as such. i think the reason we tried to do it as a briefing is so people would not have to file written testimony 72 hours ahead of time and all that. things are changing very quickly with regard to the evolving situation at the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant. while this committee does not have oversight on the safety of u.s. nuclear plants, we do have to consider how events such as those at fukushima affected the ability of our nation's nuclear freedom, 104 reactors, to supply electricity. of course, these 104 reactors currently account for about 20% of the electricity that we use and what the future of nuclear energy will be as part of our nation's energy banks. events at fukushima are changing by the our. they are serious, and we are watching those events unfold on the other side of the world. our know
, engineering efficiency, but sometimes messy government, what impact will the disaster have on japan pose a sense of self? sense of self? plus, china suspense nuclear building plans. is the future of nuclear power now in doubt? hello. anti-government groups in saudi arabia hope to emulate the unrest in tunisia, egypt and bahrain with a day of range, but it was always going to be more difficult in the tightly controlled kingdom, where protests have been banned and officially labeled anti-islamic. a huge police presence insured the barely any of the people who had planned to turn up actually did so. we travelled across the country to investigate whether the campaigners for democracy and freedom have any new hope in light of the arab revolt. >> there were more police and soldiers than people on the streets today, and not a demonstrator in sight. 30,000 had signed the facebook page to call for reform in the country, but the intimidation and threats kept them away. it is about now that thousands of protesters were set to meet in this square. over the last few days, the papers have been filled
libya coverage just ahead. first, new setbacks at the crippled nuclear reactor in japan. despite efforts to spray water on the crippled reactors, smoke is now spewing from two of them. world health officials say radiation in the food supply is much more serious than first thought. ♪ professional driver on a closed course. ♪ do not attempt at home. always wear your seat belt. ♪ and please drive responsibly. [ male announcer ] it's the most fun you can legally have. see your authorized mercedes-benz dealer for exceptional offers on the c-class. >>> now to crisis in japan, the death toll in japan has risen to more than 8,600 and more than 13,000 are missing. >> new troubles at the crippled fukushima plant. smoke could be billowing from number two and number three reactors. >> the u.s. government is making potasium iodine pills available to u.s. military families in japan. the pills block harmful effects of radiation on the thyroid. >>> the japanese government banned the sale of milk and spinach products because of high levels of radiation. the world health organization says the food s
-bye. >>> when we come back, the first confirmed american fatality from japan's tsunami. i'll talk to the young woman's family. [ female announcer ] right now he's not thinking about his future. he can't say social security... much less tell you what it means. he doesn't know that his parents are counting on the money they pay in. or that the hard earned benefits his grandparents receive... are secure. right now he's not thinking about his future. but we are. aarp has been working to preserve social security for more than 50 years. join us in a conversation to strengthen it for years to come. join us in a conversation to strengthen it thbe pt delicious gourmet gravy. and she agrees. wi fcyest gravy lovers, uratannjoy the delicious, satisfying taste grmet gravy every day. fay as the best ingredient is love. but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at lendingtree.com, where customers save an average of $293 a month. call lending tree at... today. [ male announcer ] ylord of the carry-on.. sovereign of the security line. you never take an upgrade for granted. and you rent from n
. >>> in japan, shipments of beer and related beverages increased for the second consecutive month. brewery's say the shipments total 377 mill litters. shipments of low-priced beer flavored drinks jumped 19% due to new product releases by breweries. this category of beer accounted for 39% of shipments for beer related beverages. looking in terms of total shipment e the proportion of regular beer fell to 44%. their shipments in the month dropped by 2.5%. the low malt felt by 16%. consumers remain budget conscious. >>> here's the latest market figures. . >>> officials in china are midway through the country's annual national people's congress, and we have been bringing you daily updates on the many different challenges the country faces. lisa comb ya has the latest on the congress from beijing. >> reporter: chinese legislator will express strong concern on thursday about the recent calls for pro democracy demonstrations. during the congress's sixth day, wu vowed to uphold the communist party political held system. >> the importance of sticking to the right policies is to maintain the country's basi
. gather tuchman, japan. >> thanks for the being with us this afternoon. news room continues right now with ali velshi. >> have a great afternoon. i'll pick up exactly where you left off. bring on the water and hook up the power. those are the two main strategies for bringing down the heat and, therefore, the danger at the nuclear plant that incredibly has overshadowed the natural disasters in japan. witness an act right here of sheer desperation. japanese helicopters trying to douse a super hot reactor building. reactor number three at fukushima daiichi. they dropped 7.5 tons of sea water in each of four runs over 40 minutes and appeared to have accomplished little other than to expose the crews to radiation. later, fire trucks tried to hose the building down and that's supposed to continue through the night. at the same time, the work is under way to restore electricity that was knocked out by the tsunami, electricity that runs the pumps that keeps the reactor water circulating and the fuel rods at stable temperatures. that's the whole goal of this mission. i want you to see what tho
troops and their families in japan. radioactive dust being detected at very low levels, we want to point out in seattle, washington. despite substantial progress over the weekend this is far from over. we're going to have the latest details at this hour, also the latest on the dead and missing now numbering 21,000. and the body of a young american teacher has been found. we talked about her on this show last week, her parents had been searching for her. she's the first known american fatality. we begin though with the attack on gadhafi forces in libya, now entering day four. allied forces launching as many as 80 missions today, that is up from yesterday. americans flying fewer than half of them, that is down from yesterday. according to mission commander, pro-gadhafi forces are mounting little resistance, nor is the opposition taking advantage of air strikes on pro-gadhafi missions. while grateful for the air support, they're having trouble getting organized and have little communication among themselves. here at home, there are concerns about the goals of the mission. ron paul is a lead
plants. now a look at her remarks. this is about 35 minutes. the earth shook in japan. 9.0 on the richter scale and the worst earthquake to hit japan in its recorded modern history. its epicenter was about 100 kilometers earth of the city of sen day and about -- sedona and about -- sendai and north of toke tokyo. a 10 meter high tsunami wave hit the east coast of the japanese main island of hunchu and created terrible devastation. the evening of the same day the news came that in one of the reactors of the nuclear facility in fukushima one the cooling system had failed and that in the facility a fire had broken out. the japanese government declared a nuclear state of emergency. during the following days and nights many aftershocks shook the country and it continues to this day. earthquakes and tsunamis have devastated large swaths of land of japan's northeast region and entire townships were obliterated. the number of victims is increasing. day by day. and we don't know actually how many they are. too many people are still mi
is talking about doing that. jon: thanks, carl. jenna: fox news alert out of japan, two u.s. navy ships moved out of japan due to concerns about radiation. workers at the crippled fukushima plant facing new challenges today, plumes of smoke rising from the damaged reactors forcing some workers to evacuate. the latest set back coming after engineers reported some progress in cooling the reactors and restoring power to some of the cooling systems. on top of that new concerns about the safety of food in japan. the government stopping all shipments of spinach from areas around the nuclear plants. also milk shipments also banned from nearby farms. the restrictions coming after health officials say radiation levels exceeded government safety limits, jon. jon: the grim search for victims of the disaster goes on. the scope of the tragedy climbs higher as rescue crews sift through the rubble. right now the death toll is above 8400, almost 13,000 people remain missing. amid all of the tragedy there are moments of joy. rescuers are still pulling some survivors from the wreckage. they found a teenager an
tougher attacks if he did nothing. >>> regulators in japan ignored safety warnings in one reactor and botched insus, are we competent the inspection system in this country is any better? >>> donald trump foreign policy. cheat moammar gadhafi out of his money. >>> we start with a deepening crisis in libya. nbc news chief correspondent richard engel standing by in benghazi, libya. the latest on theç ground. yesterday are you were pessimistic about the rebel force. some who have military training aren't using it. any better sign of their ability to move on tripoli today? >> reporter: no, still they are untrained and they don't have the capability to really take territory. this is something that the rebels themselves realize. i was speaking with some of the leaders of this revolt tonight and they were quite despondent. they are starting to look for outside help. they want military advisors on the ground from the united states. they said they are willing to hire them if necessary. but they recognize that if they don't get their acts together they are not going to be able to advance t
rebuilt japan and germany after world war ii and we rebuilt korea and i have no doubt that we will be the country that will pay to rebuild libya. by the way, the two largest countries that get the most foreign aid are egypt and israel, which both together get about $4 billion a year. that's the biggest expenditure. the total cost of foreign aid, i looked up the numbers for you, we are spending $25 billion to $30 billion a year often the foreign aid to all of the nations and when you look at the pathetic record of what foreign aid has achieved you have to wonder, maybe this is the first thing that republicans in congress should cut. >>neil: what is scary, when you look at all the up rest throughout the region and the country would have benefited they are not exactly slackers, it is not exactly as if we are opening up wallets for darfur but giving money to extremely rich countries, like giving a coupon to a billionaire, he could say, well, this is nice ... but i don't really need it. >>guest: given the price of oil, maybe those countries like saudi arabia just give us foreign ai
right now on libya. also an apology in japan. after more workers are exposed to potentially deadly levels of radiation. and what's being blamed for this overexposure? a communications error. all this while fears grow that one reactor at that plant could be leaking. from the cnn center in atlanta, georgia, this is your cnn start morning. hello to you all. glad you could spent some part of your saturday morning with us. i'm t.j. holmes. i do want to start now, though, in japan with the growing concern over radiation levels in the ocean water around that damaged nuclear plant. radiation levels in the air at least seem to be decreasing. paula hancock's live for us in tokyo. hello to up. what are they saying about this possible leak of one of those reaccour reactor cores. that's a key concern right now. >> reporter: absolutely. well, t.j., this was said friday evening local time when they were concerned there could have been a break or rupture within the reactor core as well and this is why the water was 10,000 times the radioactive level than it should have been. but now they're saying
district of south carolina to express our condolences to the folks, people of japan, in the wake of the 8.9 magnitude earthquake that struck off the northeast coast of japan this past friday. and the devastating tsunami that claimed the lives of thousands of people. i visited japan twice. once back in 2007, and again in 2009 where i took my oldest son. it's a beautiful country. and i know the people of japan to be a resilient, general russ -- generous, and hardworking people. in this time of inexpressable suffering and need, please know that the people of south carolina and the people of america stand with the citizens of japan. may god bless them, and may god continue to bless america. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from virginia, mr. connolly, for five minutes. mr. connolly: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, the year-long continuing resolution of the republicans in this house passed last month on a straight party-line vote represents misguided values. house republicans sought to cut an arbitrary amount of funding and did so with a meat axe, indiscriminate
not abandon also the japan. we have not abandoned them. wherever we have investment ties. it is up to the country to look out and make sure that our investments bring a return. i think the president is a good soldier. he should keep his head up even though people comment that attack him attacked his personality, attacked his demeanor. he's a good soldier and he does not address that. he should keep fighting and holding our red white, and blue flag. host: we're going to continue our discussion on what you think the president ought to say in his address on monday regarding the u.s. involvement in libya. but right now we're going to take a break and talk about what's happening in canada and joining us is david akin, national bureau chief of the ottwa sun to help us understood what's happening. guest: hi. host: on the front page of your paper, tory's lose confidence of the house and the mps off to the races. tell us what's going on. guest: that's the front page in all our papers right across the chain in canada today. kind of an odd thing. we'r
military? how does it end? >>> then, disaster in the pacific. nuclear nightmare scenario in japan. how prepare sd is united states? could it happen here? libya and japan, two crises with major consequences for the united states. >> as we begin or broadcast, the united states is at war in a third muslim country, libya. we'll take you there live in a moment. abc's team of correspondents is covering every angle of the story. i'll have an exclusive interview with moammar gadhafi's son, saif. i'll be joined here in the studios by chairman mike mullen. >>> but first, the latest headlines in the fast-moving story. a defiant moammar gadhafi is promising a long war, one day after the united states and a broad international coalition launched military strikes on his country. british and american ships and submarines fired 112 cruise missiles on more than 120 targets on the coast. b-2 bombers took out targets. they're plans to impose a no-fly zone to keep him from firing on his own people. sunday, tripoli shook with explosions and ant aircraft fire. libyan state television reported that 48 people
strikes off the coast of japan sending tremors all the way to tokyo. >>> i just broke into a house and the owners came home. >> you broke into a house? >> we bring you a 911 call with the difference. >>> we begin this hour with libyan leader moammar gadhafi. as civil war rages, he has taken to the air waves to deliver another rambling speech. he told his supporters the rebels who have taken control of parts of the country are "traitors." he talked up the libyan standard of living saying it was the envy of many in the world and urging his country men to stand up and defend it. and he repeated his claim that al qaeda is to blame for unrest in libya saying it has drugged young people to get them to fight. >> they don't understand economic politics, sociology, technology, in order to be used for the welfare of humanity. they want to destroy our great industrial labor, our technology, bridges. those things for them is good. they have -- their good action is to destroy the -- our culture, our schools, our hospitals. they consider themselves and other people are all infidels. those are th
're in stark contrast to japan right now, john. >> this is the other major story we're following. coming up, the heartbreaking images of ruin and recovery. stay with us. you know when to hold 'em... and how to fold 'em. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle...and go. you can even take a full-size or above and still pay the mid-size price. here we are... [ male announcer ] and there you go, business pro. there you go. go national. go like a pro. but basically, i'm a runner. last year. (oof). i had a bum knee that needed surgery. but it got complicated, because i had an old injury. so i wanted a doctor who had done this before. and unitedhealthcare's database helped me find a surgeon. you know you can't have great legs, if you don't have good knees. we're 78,000 people looking out for 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. basic. preferred. at meineke i have options on oil changes. and now i get free roadside assistance with preferred or supreme. my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> back to libya in just a moment. w
today as one of those troubled reactors in japan. why this could be the worst thing we've hed so far. we'll be right back. i was diagnosed with copd. i could not take a deep breath i noticed i was having trouble. climbing the stairs, working in the garden, painting. my doctor suggested spiriva right then. no announcer: spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled maintenance treatment for copd, which includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. love what it does. it opens up the airways. announcer: spiriva does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. stop taking spiriva and call your doctor right away if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, have vision changes or eye pain, g or have problems passing urine. tell your doctor if you have glaucoma, problems passing urine, as or an enlarged prostate, as these may worsen with spiriva. also, discuss the medicines you take, even eye drops. ip side effects include dry mouth, constipation, and trouble passing urine. th it makes me breathe easier. i can't do everything i used to do. but there's a lot i
in mizurata now. >> japan's nuclear nightmare. turns out the danger is greater than first thought. >> the situation surrounding the accident is still very grave. >> and tonight, a man inside the fukushima plant when the earthquake hit. i'll ask him how he got out alive. >>> and israel, more from my exclusive interview with a surprisingly emotional prime minister benjamin netanyahu. >> they're given a pass, the palestinian authority. and i say stop giving them a pass. >>> and i'll ask the chief plo representative to the united states if he can make peace with netanyahu. this is a special live edition of "piers morgan tonight" from london. good evening, we begin with libya. president obama is warning muammar gadhafi the international community will go ahead with air strikes if gadhafi does not abide by cease-fire. arwa damon is in libya tonight. what do you think is happening now? when do you think we may see some military action? >> reporter: well, piers, that's what everyone here really wants to know. when it comes to that cease-fire that is meant to have been implemented immediat
now go to anderson cooper with "ac 360" live from japan. >>> piers, it is truly an extraordinary development to find somebody alive eight days, particularly remarkable when you consider so many of the injuries and the deaths we've seen were caused by that tsunami with all that debris and fast moving water. remarkable that this person apparently survived that long. and also with freezing cold temperatures at night. we'll try to find out more details on that. also the latest on the nuclear emergency that is ongoing right now. in the fukushima daiichi plant. the latest information on that is that the japanese government is finally admitting that the situation has indeed been worse than previously acknowledged. the government giving a grimmer assessment of the disaster, raising the threat level to level five out of seven, conceding it is worse than they previously said, something america's top nuclear regulator has been saying for two days. the wind had been blowing out to sea. it is now blowing on shore. we'll tell you what that means for cities like tokyo. according to "the new yor
. the short-term effects, the idea -- >> we're interrupting that tape to take you live to japan where the chief secretary is speaking. he is the government's point person on making announcements. let's listen to what he has to say. >> we were in the middle of the process of preparation. i cannot give you any definitive information. for the third and fourth reactor, we have been able to, we believe -- excuse me. this is for the number three reactor. the spent fuel storage. we have been able to capture water inside. at this point in time, we believe the situation has been stabilized. much remains to be seen. we will continue on with the water spraying operation for number three reactor. at the same time we make sure there will be continuous operation for number four reactor operation as well. furthermore, more fundamental solution will be sought after that is restoration and this preparation has progressed. that's from external transmission lines. we will be able to monitor the environment at the site and we will be able to stabilize the situation there. efforts are still under way. wit
. >>> and new u.s. assessments of the radiation risks from japan's nuclear crisis and new progress inside the plant to shed light on the damage from the sudan. i'm wolf blitzer. you are in "the situation room." >>> some very anxious hours for the u.s. military after the crash of a fighter jet, giving way to relief now that the two crew members are safely out of libya. defense officials confirming that both the pilot and the weapons officer have been rescued. they say the f-15 eagle had an equipment malfunction and did not go down because of enemy fire. let's talk more about the crash and its rescue, how it played out minute by minute, we will go to our pentagon correspondent, chris lawrence. chris, you have been able to see the military's timeline. what happened? >> exactly, wolf. we have a close look at it, it really proves that no fly does not mean no risk. i mean this could have been disastrous, if these pilots had gone down in an area controlled by moammar gadhafi. two u.s. fighter jets take off from italy on a strike run to destroy moammar gadhafi's air defense. as they fly over east
at noathat is furloughed for 21 days, if you live in japan or you live on the pacific coast or there are some tornadoes in the midwest, tough luck. we had to furlough those employees who would have warned you to evacuate the low-lying areas in the oregon-california coast and in hawaii but, no, they have targeted massive cuts at the noaa budget. $450 million. it's estimated that noaa would have, because of the time of year, 21 days of furloughs for all its employees. $110 million in cuts to the national weather service. a big cut to state disaster preparedness plans. so right now our emergency operation centers in oregon, in california, in hawaii are in full swing, and the reason that they are able to be in touch with people in scattered coastal communities, in relatively difficult areas is because of the federal assistance that we've given to them to set up these centers. and under the republicans' budget, we would cut $206 million from state emergency operation centers. now, where are the states going to get the money in this ba climate? i guess those places won't be tended to either. we won
recovery. >>> japan's current account surplus marked its first drop in nearly two months due to a jump in imports and soaring prices of crude oil and iron ore. the finance ministry set in a preliminary report on tuesday that the surplus for january totaled around $5.6 billion. that is a plunge of almost 48% from a year earlier. the trade deficit for january was $4.8 billion. the ministry said weaker exports during china's lunar new year holidays were another negative factor. this is the first time in two years that the trade balance has tipped into the red. the income balance, which includes returns on foreign investment, rose above 10%. the increase was due to improved earnings and overseas subsidiaries of japanese firms. >>> credit worries continue on heavily indebted european countries. this has led a u.s. credit rating agency to downgrade greek government bonds by three notches. moody's said on monday it lowered the rating of greek debt from the already below investment grade of b.a.-1 to b.-1. since running into a debt crisis last year, greece has been trying to turn around its fi
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